Katherine Hayton | Roadshows
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26 Nov / Roadshows

I have the pleasure of attending a roadshow tomorrow. I don’t remember getting or accepting an invitation but I’ve been told that I’m going so I’ve chosen to believe for the time being that this is true.

Looking back I’ve been counting up the hours that I’ve spent at roadshows throughout my life. Time that I’ve spent being too warm, too cold, absolutely so cold that my nipples were in danger of cutting through the front of my blouse, and hungry.

I’ve deliberately left bored off of that little list. Is this because I don’t start vapidly staring into space and pondering the mysteries of the universe after ten minutes and then trying to chew my fingernails off after twelve? No. It’s because I just anticipate that when everyone read the word Roadshow they took boredom as a given. And boy do they deliver.

Even worse than the gnawing discontent of boredom is the group activities. Someone always tells the exec that these will liven up their deadpan audience and really get them involved in the message. Someone should stop telling them that. Someone is lying, or such a bad judge of human emotion and interaction that they shouldn’t have a job. Certainly not a job where they can talk to people of influence. Not when they’re been dropped on their heads as kids.

A couple of years ago we had to get together and generate ideas for new apps. Awesome. Kids are making a fortune for the same, and we’re getting rewarded with half a club sandwich (the soggy half) and a bottle of water. I didn’t contribute a lot to that one.

Another time we had to move rice between bowls with chopsticks. That was a tad more amusing. In our team there were two pairs of chopsticks available. We handed them to the Japanese woman and the Malaysian man. People from Christchurch are so not racist.

A Long Time Ago, in a Company Far Far Away there was a man who was legend. He created a roadshow that people enjoyed so much that they willingly signed up for the roadshow the following year. Sadly, it wasn’t as good as the first. And then he was fired left the company to attend to family commitments.

Because of him there exists a little spark of hope in every employee in our company’s bosom. A little spark that tends to be extinguished halfway through the first sentence of a roadshow, but reignites the following year nonetheless. I can feel its glow sparking up now.

But onto other things you could be doing right now – after you finish reading this…

One stop shop tonight at Hope. Dreams. Life. Love… Toddle along there to get a load of my book full of hopelessness, broken dreams, the end of life, and the loss of love. A good fit, right?

By Katherine Hayton in Katherine Hayton's Blog
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