Katherine Hayton | Not getting that Sunday feeling
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26 Apr / Not getting that Sunday feeling

I often complain bitterly about our current government. I’m a socialist at heart, so my voting usually leans lightly to the left.

However, today I’m rather pleased that the right wing were in office to enact the legislation in 2014 that means that tonight, despite being Sunday, I’m not getting that Sunday feeling.

You know, that sinking feeling that grows throughout the afternoon, and puts a damper on anything that you’re doing in the evening.

The regret that you feel as you crawl under the covers. The list of things that you were so positive you were going to get done during the weekend but didn’t even come close to touching upon.

Unless you’re on a different contract and work on bizarre days and at bizarre hours (my definition of bizarre being anything outside the hours of 8.30 to 5.00 on Monday to Friday) then you’ll know what I’m talking about. If you’re bizarre then please insert whatever the bizarro equivalent is for you.

Anzac Day is always commemorated on the 25th April. It’s the day in 1915 that the New Zealand and Australian troops landed on the beach in the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey where they would begin a two-way slaughter that ended on the 9th January 1916 in defeat of the Allied troops and the loss of quarter of a million combatants on either side.

What a great day to celebrate. Who needed those half a million people anyway.

Turkey gracefully allows the countries that invaded its borders and slaughtered its countrymen into the area each year to commemorate the campaign. Because this year marks the centenary there’s been even more stuff happening than usual.

While I have the greatest respect and gratitude for our servicemen, I have to admit that I’m slightly more interested in the public holidayness of the whole thing.

Until this year if a public holiday fell on a Saturday or a Sunday, and those happened to be days that you weren’t working anyway, you missed out on a holiday. Between Waitangi Day always being celebrated on 6th February, and Anzac Day always being celebrated on 25th April, there have been years where we’ve missed out on either or even both of them.

There was even that horrid time where the leap year in between meant there were fewer years celebrating both and more years celebrating neither.

But now we have Mondayisation. And yeah, that’s a word. It may be a word that we made up because it’s annoying to say things like ‘the occasion whereby a public holiday falls on the weekend and therefore workers who don’t work during the weekend may take the public holiday on the Monday instead’ but that’s just a good a reason to invent a new word as any other.

So this is the trial run. Yesterday, we have the ceremonies marking the centenary since the Anzac troops landed in Gallipoli, and tomorrow I have the ceremony marking the sleeping in of the Katherine.

Thank you National Party. Your work here is done, you may now leave the Beehive.

By Katherine Hayton in Katherine Hayton's Blog
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