Katherine Hayton | EOM Accounts
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27 Nov / EOM Accounts

Since starting my online business (as I refer to my book being available on Amazon) I have been keeping to a strict regimen of end of month accounting to keep track of my income losses.

It was going great guns at first – I put in a cash injection to get the whole show rolling so was immediately in profit. I just needed to sell a few copies here and there, and I could legitimately claim success. Then I decided that I wasn’t generating as many sales as I thought were warranted (damn you competitive streak!) so instead of investing in more physical stock to flog around the office, I would start to advertise.

The downfall was sudden. That s**t costs money you know. And you’d be amazed at how high a figure you have to reach before you’re due a royalty payment. And then you’d be amazed how long the retailer can hold onto a royalty payment before remembering that it belongs to you and sending it along.

It’s hard to say that you’ve earned out your investment when it’s still three months away. But when I get it…

So every month I sit down to the grim news that there is much bill and little no income. If I was running this as a legitimate business instead of a wouldn’t-it-be-nice-if-I-could-make-a-success-of-this-hobby business I’d be sorely disappointed.

Luckily you expect to tip a never-ending supply of funding into your hobby because it’s what you enjoy. And on that score I’m definitely a success.

Another drawback to this soul-destroying hobby of mine is that I spend a portion of every day looking at work accounts. That means when I do accounts at home, even though theoretically it’s part of my play-time, it feels distressingly like work.

Still, when it’s your time of the month, it’s your time of the month.

By Katherine Hayton in Katherine Hayton's Blog

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